A collection of chemical weapons layed out in organized piles on a white background. There are (counter clockwise from the top left) four triple chaser grenade pieces, 4 full grenades, two sozen grenade clips, over 60 skat pellets, 4 skat shells, 7 grenade pins, a variety of overshot wad (aka pogs), FN303 rounds (yellow, pink, red, clear), hanball grenade pieces and rubber bucksot, and red and purple pepperballs). You can smell the corrosion on the air.

Rough pen sketch of a person with hair pulled back in a ponytail in goggles and a lab coat holding a chemical grenade, with one hand on the side/bottom and one hand on the fuse top.

Chemical Weapons Research Consortium


We are an interdisciplinary, international group of researchers and activists focused on understanding and communicating how chemical weapons affect people and the environment.


Get involved!

Rough pen sketch of a person with hair pulled back in a ponytail in goggles and a lab coat holding a chemical grenade, with one hand on the side/bottom and one hand on the fuse top.

Formed in 2020 during the Black Lives Matter protests in Portland, Oregon, we are a collection of researchers and advocates around the world focused on understanding the impact of chemical weapons used by law enforcement on humans and the environment. Our projects are diverse, but we are brought together by an urgent need to understand what chemicals are being used by military and law enforcement and how they are affecting all of us.


Dr. Kate Ellenberger (she/her), Heritech Consulting
Anthropology, collections

Dr. David Dayan (he/him), Oregon State University
Molecular ecology, fisheries genomics

Jake Dockter (he/him)
Activist, researcher, rabble-rouser

Morgan (they/them), Team Raccoon PDX
Collector, organizer, trash panda

Dr. Alexander Samuel (he/him), scientist
Molecular Biology, toxicology

Dr. Juniper L. Simonis (they/them), Lead Scientist DAPPER Stats
Aquatic ecotoxicology, biogeochemistry, conservation biology, quantitative ecology

Support Our Work


Our members are engaged in a variety of projects that need support; please help if you can!


Analyzing Chemical Weapons Residue

DAPPER Stats is working with local university researchers and Specialty Analytical to understand the impact of chemical weapons residues in Portland OR’s parks, schools, houses, and rivers. A key component of this work is the identifying and measuring of compounds in the samples, which requires expensive equipment and reagents as well as staff with specialized skills. This campaign is targeted at funding the processing of samples collected in an elementary school playground, where Department of Homeland Security agents deployed toxic chemical weapons.

Prior to this campaign, all of the chemical weapons research had been funded completely through DAPPER Stats' internal funds, and we currently have no other funding for this research.

Get Involved

Interested in getting hands on in your support? There are so many ways to help out!

There are countless research questions that could use answers, so if you’re keen to science some stuff, please do! If you need more information or want to chat, please reach out!

We’re currently working up descriptions of specific tasks or projects we could use help with, so stay tuned! Contact us for more information in the meantime!

A collection of chemical weapons layed out in organized piles on a white background. There are (counter clockwise from the top left) four triple chaser grenade pieces, 4 full grenades, two sozen grenade clips, over 60 skat pellets, 4 skat shells, 7 grenade pins, a variety of overshot wad (aka pogs), FN303 rounds (yellow, pink, red, clear), hanball grenade pieces and rubber bucksot, and red and purple pepperballs). You can smell the corrosion on the air.